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Anorgasmia

What Is Anorgasmia?

AnorgasmiaAnorgasmia is the medical term for regular difficulty reaching orgasm after ample sexual stimulation, causing you personal distress. Anorgasmia is actually a very common occurrence, affecting at least 1 in 5 women worldwide.

Orgasms vary in intensity, and women vary in the frequency of their orgasms and the amount of stimulation necessary to trigger an orgasm. In fact, fewer than a third of women consistently have orgasms with sexual activity. Plus, orgasms often change with age, medical issues or medications you’re taking.

If you’re happy with the climax of your sexual activities, there’s no need for concern. However, if you’re bothered by lack of orgasm or the intensity of your orgasms, talk to your doctor about anorgasmia. Lifestyle changes and sex therapy may help.

Symptoms

An orgasm is a feeling of intense physical pleasure and release of tension, accompanied by involuntary, rhythmic contractions of your pelvic floor muscles. But it doesn’t always look — or sound — like that famous scene from “When Harry Met Sally.” Some women actually feel pelvic contractions or a quivering of the uterus during orgasm, but some don’t. Some women describe fireworks all over the body, while others describe the feeling as a tingle.

By definition, the major symptoms of anorgasmia are inability to experience orgasm or long delays in reaching orgasm. But there are different types of anorgasmia:

  • Primary anorgasmia. This means you’ve never experienced an orgasm.
  • Secondary anorgasmia. This means you used to have orgasms, but now experience difficulty reaching climax.
  • Situational anorgasmia. This means you are able to orgasm only during certain circumstances, such as during oral sex or masturbation. This is very common in women. In fact, about 80 percent of women experience orgasm only from stimulation of the clitoris.
  • General anorgasmia. This means you aren’t able to orgasm in any situation or with any partner.

When to see a doctor

Talk to your doctor if you have questions about orgasm or concerns about your ability to achieve orgasm. You may find that your sexual experiences are normal. Or your doctor may recommend strategies to reduce your anxiety and increase your satisfaction.

By: Mayo Clinic Staff